Seek narrator for comics and SF author bio audiobk

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Project Main Details

Seek narrator for comics and SF author bio audiobk 
ZD2203766
We are seeking a narrator for the audiobook version of a nonfiction biography chronicling the career of Otto Binder [pronounced to rhyme with “tinder”], from pulp magazine author to writer of Supergirl, Captain Marvel, and Superman comics. As the originator of the first sentient robot in literature (in 1939), Binder's effect on science fiction was profound. Within the world of comic books, he created or co-created much of the Superman universe, including Smallville; Krypto, Superboy's dog; Supergirl; and the villain Braniac. Binder is also credited with writing many of the first "Bizarro" storylines for DC Comics, as well as for being the main writer for the Captain Marvel comics. In later years, Binder expanded from comic books into pure science writing, publishing dozens of books and articles on the subject of satellites and space travel as well as UFOs and extraterrestrial life. This work weaves together Binder's professional successes and personal tragedies, including the death of his only daughter and his wife's struggle with mental illness. If interested, please provide a ~5 minute reading of the attached script. Rate is somewhat flexible, but we are seeking something in the $175-$200 per finished hour range. The reading style should be enthusiastic (as befits its subject) and informal but poised (with appropriate warmth and feeling), and not too casual or theatrical. An engaged and empathetic, natural-sounding voice that does not have exaggerated resonance or nasality is preferred. 
2017-04-05 19:21:22 GMT
2017-04-10 14:00:00 (GMT -08:00) Pacific Time (US & Canada) 
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1 direct invitation(s) have been sent by the voice seeker resulting in 0 audition(s) and/or proposal(s) so far.
Voice123 SmartCast is seeking 30 auditions and/or proposals for this project (approx.) Invitations sent by SmartCast have resulted in 20 audition(s) and/or proposal(s) so far.

Project Parameters

The Voice Actor should be located in:
To be defined
Audiobooks
No
85000 WORDS
English - USA and Canada
Not defined
Young Adult Male OR Middle Age Male OR Senior Male
• Audio files must be delivered via FTP/Dropbox/Google Drive/cloud
• Deliver edited and finished voice tracks
Not defined
The voice seeker is willing to hire either union or non-union talents for this project

Script Details

Yes
N/A 
In all the years he was writing comic book stories, Otto Binder never dreamed that anyone would remember those stories in later years, or that he would receive any special recognition for having written them. He felt that his literary legacy, if any, would be a result of his science fiction (SF) stories of the 1930s and 1940s, starring the intelligent robot Adam Link, the immortal Anton York, and others.
As Binder surveyed the crowd of fans and admirers in a meeting room on the morning of July 31, 1965, however, he must have realized that his work in comic books was far from forgotten.
On this occasion, the man with the curly hair and cherubic smile was a special guest of the 1965 New York Comicon, sponsored by the Academy of Comic Book Fans and Collectors. He was flocked by fans from the moment he entered the ballroom of the Hotel Broadway Central.
He had been one of the most prolific writers of comics not for fame or glory, but to put food on the table. In two of his three decades in that industry, he had composed some 2,227 comic book stories (and had the
records to prove it). He’d produced comics scripts that became classics of the medium. Who knew they would be remembered by so many, not just by kids but by a surprisingly large number of older teenagers and adults?
One of those admirers took the microphone. His name was Jerry G. Bails, PhD. Bails was a professor of science and technology at Wayne State University, hardly one of the depraved youths whose minds were forever rotted by reading comics, as the anti-comics alarmists of the 1950s would have had us believe. Bails leaned into the microphone. “We’re honored today to have with us a gentlemen whose work spans the entire history of the comics magazine field … Mr. Otto Binder! ”
In the room were colleagues: Mort Weisinger, Jim Warren, Gardner Fox, Bill Finger—all giants in the comics field. Waiting at the periphery was a local CBS television news crew, and a reporter from the New Yorker magazine, both eager to interview him. Amid tumultuous applause, the middle-aged man of medium height made his way to the dais.
Otto Binder, at that moment, was on top of the world. Yes, there had been difficulties along the way, but now, he felt that things were on the upswing. He had a dynamic, intelligent wife, an adorable teenage daughter, a comfortable home, and was working for the top comic book publisher of the day.
Excitingly, he was finding renewed interest in his influential stories written for the science fiction pulp magazines of the 1930s and 1940s. Both the Anton York and Adam Link stories were collected into mass-market paperbacks, and there was talk of sequels to be written afresh. Adam Link—the first “feeling” robot in popular fiction—had recently been turned into an episode of the acclaimed Outer Limits television show, under the original title, “I, Robot.” His science writing for NASA and in numerous nonfiction books had made him an authority on the space race of the 1960s, and had put him in touch with a whole new audience. Still, it was his extraordinary work in the comic book field that made this moment of acclaim possible.
Hard work and inspiration had been invested, and the future held much promise. But promises can be made, and they can be broken. Otto Binder, a man of sterling character and stellar achievements, would intimately know personal tragedy in the coming years. 
Please note that you should only use the script or your recording of it for auditioning purposes. The script is property, unless otherwise specified, of the voice seeker and it is protected by international copyright laws.

Voice-Seeker Details

95936
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2014-05-05
22

25


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