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MH PROJECT 
ZD2726547
MH PROJECTCamera Shots, Angles, and Movements


I’m sure you’re itching to start shooting. In fact, I bet you already have, but do you know the tricks of the trade? Do you know the industry standards? Before you start making a new style for yourself, you better know what tools you have to choose from.

Proper framing:
The first thing to learn is how to frame your subject. If you’re a still photographer you’ll already know about the rule of thirds. This works for film making as well. Notice the book below.

The rule of thirds:
This is a general principle in photography, which is generally considered to make shots more appealing to the eye. One can easily visualize this rule by taking a frame and dividing the horizontal piece into three equal sections and dividing the vertical in three equal sections. This creates 9 equal sections. Where these sections meet are four points on the frame. By aligning the central object into these points of the frame (often called the power points), instead of centering the object, you get more aesthetically and professional-looking shots
However, we should note that while we describe this as the RULE of thirds, it might better be used as a guideline.

Common uses of this rule in video are:
Framing an interview: The eyes of your subject should fall in one of the upper and the subject should be looking towards the empty space on the frame.
Shooting a horizon: Rather than position the horizon on the center of the frame, align it along the upper or lower third depending on what you want to emphasize. For example, if you’re shooting a cloud time-lapse you will want two-thirds of the shot centered on the sky.

Basic Camera Shot types:


Extreme Wide Shots (EWS) - Act to establish the area.

Wide Shots (WS)- Show the entire person or area. They’re great for establishing the scene and allow for good action of the characters. Sometimes this is known as the long shot.

Medium Shots (MS) - Frame the subject from the waste up. This is the most common shot and allows for hand gestures and motion.

Medium Close Ups (MCU) - Shots show the subject in more detail and are often framed from just below the shoulders to the top of the head.

Close Ups (CU) - Show a particular part of your subject. For people this usually means the shot frames just the head!

Extreme Close Ups (ECU) - Are much tighter close-up shots in which you get detail greater than the human eye might be able to normally perceive. An example of this shot might be of the mouth and eyes together.



Advanced Camera Shot Types


Two Shot: This is a shot of two peoples (or other individuals) together.

Cut Away (CA): Cutaways are used in the editing process to fill in footage which is different from the main action. B-roll is often used for cut-aways. An example might be a cut away of a bird singing if the shot is focused on a couple in the woods.

Over the Shoulder Shots (OSS): Are shot from behind the person towards their subject. Generally the frame is cut off just behind the ear, although there are several variations. A good technique to use to get this shot is to frame the person facing the subject with about one third of the frame.

Point of View (POV): This is an effective shot that gives the audience the feel that you’re seeing it from the eyes of the performer. It is taken from near the eye-level of the actor and shows what he might see. It could be used to give the perspective of other animals too like a frog, a bird, or a fish.

Selective Focus: By using a large aperture value (f/1.4, f/2.0) you will be able to create a shallow depth of field. This effectively leaves one part of the frame in focus while blurring others, such as the foreground or background. When you change the focus in the shot from the foreground to the background you’re doing another advanced camera shot called a rack focus.

Part-2

Tilt: Moving the cameras lens up or down while keeping its horizontal axis constant. Nod your head up and down - this is tilting.

Pan: Moving the camera lens to one side or another. Look to your left, then look to your right - that's panning.

Zoom: Zooming is one camera move that most people are probably familiar with. It involves changing the focal length of the lens to make the subject appear closer or further away in the frame. Most video cameras today have built-in zoom features. Some have manual zooms as well, and many have several zoom speeds. Zooming is one of the most frequently-used camera moves and one of the most overused. Use it carefully.

Pedestal: Moving the camera up or down without changing its vertical or horizontal axis. A camera operator can do two types of pedestals: pedestal up means "move the camera up;" pedestal down means "move the camera down." You are not tilting the lens up, rather you are moving the entire camera up. Imagine your camera is on a tripod and you're raising or lowering the tripod head (this is exactly where the term comes from).

Dolly: Motion towards or motion from. The name comes from the old "dolly tracks" that used to be laid down for the heavy camera to move along - very much like railroad tracks - in the days before Steadicams got so popular. The phrase dolly-in means step towards the subject with the camera, while dolly-out means to step backwards with the camera, keeping the zoom the same. Zooming the camera changes the focal length of the lens, which can introduce wide-angle distortion or changes in the apparent depth of field. For this reason, it's sometimes preferable to dolly than zoom.

Truck: Trucking is like dollying, but it involves motion left or right. Truck left means "move the camera physically to the left while maintaining its perpendicular relationship." This is not to be confused with a pan, where the camera remains firmly on its axis while the lens turns to one direction or the other. You might truck left to stay with a pedestrian as she walks down a street.

The Fancy Camera Moves:


Now that you understand the basics, here are few more advanced moves. Some of these usually require the use of a steady device and one or two crew members to execute smoothly.

Hand held Shooting: Sometimes the action is moving too quickly or too unpredictably for the camera to be on a tripod. This calls for making the camera more mobile and able to follow the action of a scene. Most times the camera will simply be held by the operator, who will then employ a number of basic camera moves by moving the feet - trucking in and out, dollying in one direction or another, tilting, panning, zooming - and combinations of all of these.

Floating Cam or Stabilizing Shot: The Steadicam was invented in 1971 by Philadelphia native Garrett Brown. Famously used in the jogging sequence in Rocky and extensively with exceptional effect in the Kubrick masterpiece, The Shining. It uses a series of counterweights (and gyroscopes on more-expensive models) to keep a hand held camera's motion very smooth. Although the term "Steadicam" is used often, this is a trademark name belonging to the Merlin company. Similar to Kleenex for tissues, we call the devices that are non-Steadicams "stabilizers". Stabilizers for the small-business video producer are plentiful, much more affordable and are widely used today.

Crane/Jib: A crane can be used to lift a camera (and operator, if it's big enough) from low to high shooting positions. Less expensive jibs can support the weight of a camera and lift it several feet off of the ground. Sometimes called a boom, but the boom term usually applies to the device that holds a microphone aloft.

Presented By:


MURSALIN HASAN
DIRECTOR
UNITED PRODUCTION

A presents of united production.
Email: unitedproductionltd@gmail.com 
2017-06-06 13:50:47 GMT
2017-06-16 19:00:00 (GMT +06:00) Columbo 
Yes (click here to learn more about Voice123's SmartCast)
Closed
3
0
0 direct invitation(s) have been sent by the voice seeker resulting in 0 audition(s) and/or proposal(s) so far.
Voice123 SmartCast is seeking 10 auditions and/or proposals for this project (approx.) Invitations sent by SmartCast have resulted in 3 audition(s) and/or proposal(s) so far.

Project Parameters

The Voice Actor should be located in:
Flexible Price - USD 100 to USD 150
Movie and game trailers
Via Radio, TV, Internet: NEW YORK
10 MINUTES
English - British
Not defined
Young Adult Male
ISDN AND
• Phone Patch AND
• Audio files must be delivered via email AND
• Audio files must be delivered via FTP/Dropbox/Google Drive/cloud
There are no special pre-, post-, or production requirements for this project.
Not defined
This is a non-union project

Script Details

Yes
N/A 
Camera Shots, Angles, and Movements


I’m sure you’re itching to start shooting. In fact, I bet you already have, but do you know the tricks of the trade? Do you know the industry standards? Before you start making a new style for yourself, you better know what tools you have to choose from.

Proper framing:
The first thing to learn is how to frame your subject. If you’re a still photographer you’ll already know about the rule of thirds. This works for film making as well. Notice the book below.

The rule of thirds:
This is a general principle in photography, which is generally considered to make shots more appealing to the eye. One can easily visualize this rule by taking a frame and dividing the horizontal piece into three equal sections and dividing the vertical in three equal sections. This creates 9 equal sections. Where these sections meet are four points on the frame. By aligning the central object into these points of the frame (often called the power points), instead of centering the object, you get more aesthetically and professional-looking shots
However, we should note that while we describe this as the RULE of thirds, it might better be used as a guideline.

Common uses of this rule in video are:
Framing an interview: The eyes of your subject should fall in one of the upper and the subject should be looking towards the empty space on the frame.
Shooting a horizon: Rather than position the horizon on the center of the frame, align it along the upper or lower third depending on what you want to emphasize. For example, if you’re shooting a cloud time-lapse you will want two-thirds of the shot centered on the sky.

Basic Camera Shot types:


Extreme Wide Shots (EWS) - Act to establish the area.

Wide Shots (WS)- Show the entire person or area. They’re great for establishing the scene and allow for good action of the characters. Sometimes this is known as the long shot.

Medium Shots (MS) - Frame the subject from the waste up. This is the most common shot and allows for hand gestures and motion.

Medium Close Ups (MCU) - Shots show the subject in more detail and are often framed from just below the shoulders to the top of the head.

Close Ups (CU) - Show a particular part of your subject. For people this usually means the shot frames just the head!

Extreme Close Ups (ECU) - Are much tighter close-up shots in which you get detail greater than the human eye might be able to normally perceive. An example of this shot might be of the mouth and eyes together.



Advanced Camera Shot Types


Two Shot: This is a shot of two peoples (or other individuals) together.

Cut Away (CA): Cutaways are used in the editing process to fill in footage which is different from the main action. B-roll is often used for cut-aways. An example might be a cut away of a bird singing if the shot is focused on a couple in the woods.

Over the Shoulder Shots (OSS): Are shot from behind the person towards their subject. Generally the frame is cut off just behind the ear, although there are several variations. A good technique to use to get this shot is to frame the person facing the subject with about one third of the frame.

Point of View (POV): This is an effective shot that gives the audience the feel that you’re seeing it from the eyes of the performer. It is taken from near the eye-level of the actor and shows what he might see. It could be used to give the perspective of other animals too like a frog, a bird, or a fish.

Selective Focus: By using a large aperture value (f/1.4, f/2.0) you will be able to create a shallow depth of field. This effectively leaves one part of the frame in focus while blurring others, such as the foreground or background. When you change the focus in the shot from the foreground to the background you’re doing another advanced camera shot called a rack focus.

Part-2

Tilt: Moving the cameras lens up or down while keeping its horizontal axis constant. Nod your head up and down - this is tilting.

Pan: Moving the camera lens to one side or another. Look to your left, then look to your right - that's panning.

Zoom: Zooming is one camera move that most people are probably familiar with. It involves changing the focal length of the lens to make the subject appear closer or further away in the frame. Most video cameras today have built-in zoom features. Some have manual zooms as well, and many have several zoom speeds. Zooming is one of the most frequently-used camera moves and one of the most overused. Use it carefully.

Pedestal: Moving the camera up or down without changing its vertical or horizontal axis. A camera operator can do two types of pedestals: pedestal up means "move the camera up;" pedestal down means "move the camera down." You are not tilting the lens up, rather you are moving the entire camera up. Imagine your camera is on a tripod and you're raising or lowering the tripod head (this is exactly where the term comes from).

Dolly: Motion towards or motion from. The name comes from the old "dolly tracks" that used to be laid down for the heavy camera to move along - very much like railroad tracks - in the days before Steadicams got so popular. The phrase dolly-in means step towards the subject with the camera, while dolly-out means to step backwards with the camera, keeping the zoom the same. Zooming the camera changes the focal length of the lens, which can introduce wide-angle distortion or changes in the apparent depth of field. For this reason, it's sometimes preferable to dolly than zoom.

Truck: Trucking is like dollying, but it involves motion left or right. Truck left means "move the camera physically to the left while maintaining its perpendicular relationship." This is not to be confused with a pan, where the camera remains firmly on its axis while the lens turns to one direction or the other. You might truck left to stay with a pedestrian as she walks down a street.

The Fancy Camera Moves:


Now that you understand the basics, here are few more advanced moves. Some of these usually require the use of a steady device and one or two crew members to execute smoothly.

Hand held Shooting: Sometimes the action is moving too quickly or too unpredictably for the camera to be on a tripod. This calls for making the camera more mobile and able to follow the action of a scene. Most times the camera will simply be held by the operator, who will then employ a number of basic camera moves by moving the feet - trucking in and out, dollying in one direction or another, tilting, panning, zooming - and combinations of all of these.

Floating Cam or Stabilizing Shot: The Steadicam was invented in 1971 by Philadelphia native Garrett Brown. Famously used in the jogging sequence in Rocky and extensively with exceptional effect in the Kubrick masterpiece, The Shining. It uses a series of counterweights (and gyroscopes on more-expensive models) to keep a hand held camera's motion very smooth. Although the term "Steadicam" is used often, this is a trademark name belonging to the Merlin company. Similar to Kleenex for tissues, we call the devices that are non-Steadicams "stabilizers". Stabilizers for the small-business video producer are plentiful, much more affordable and are widely used today.

Crane/Jib: A crane can be used to lift a camera (and operator, if it's big enough) from low to high shooting positions. Less expensive jibs can support the weight of a camera and lift it several feet off of the ground. Sometimes called a boom, but the boom term usually applies to the device that holds a microphone aloft.

Presented By:


MURSALIN HASAN
DIRECTOR
UNITED PRODUCTION

A presents of united production.
Email: unitedproductionltd@gmail.com 
Please note that you should only use the script or your recording of it for auditioning purposes. The script is property, unless otherwise specified, of the voice seeker and it is protected by international copyright laws.

Voice-Seeker Details

121052
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2017-06-06
1

0


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