Cockspur Lighthouse Mini Documentary

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Project Main Details

Cockspur Lighthouse Mini Documentary 
ZDLTK152010717538X
A short documentary on the history of the Cockspur Island Lighthouse in Savannah, Georiga. For use to visitors wanting to gain more knowledge on the historic strucutre.



 
2008-09-14 15:24:53 GMT
2008-09-15 13:01:18 (GMT -05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada) 
Yes (click here to learn more about Voice123's SmartCast)
Closed - Note: This project was manually closed by the voice seeker before it reached its original deadline.
3
3
1 direct invitation(s) have been sent by the voice seeker resulting in 0 audition(s) and/or proposal(s) so far.
Voice123 SmartCast is seeking 50 auditions and/or proposals for this project (approx.) Invitations sent by SmartCast have resulted in 3 audition(s) and/or proposal(s) so far.

Project Parameters

The Voice Actor should be located in:
Student or Non-for-profit student project - USD 50
Documentaries
No
8-10 minutes
English - USA and Canada
None
Middle Age Female OR Middle Age Male OR Senior Female OR Senior Male
• Audio files must be delivered via email
There are no special pre-, post-, or production requirements for this project.
Not defined
The voice seeker is willing to hire either union or non-union talents for this project

Script Details

Yes
Full script:

Clinging to the tip of Cockspur Island, the Cockspur Lighthouse has withstood crashing waves, the roar of cannons, and the wrath of time. For more than 150 years it has defiantly stood guard over the mouth of the Savannah River.

In 1848, John Norris, a New York architect, was contracted to supervise construction of an illuminated station on Cockspur Island. The noted architect would design many of Savannah's grand structures including the United States Custom House in downtown Savannah, the Mercer-Wilder House, and the Green-Meldrim House.

Norris's duties were to "repair, alter, and put up lanterns and lights on Cockspur Island...and to erect a suitable keeper's house." This first tower had a focal plane 25’ above sea level. The beacon housed a fixed white light emanating from five lamps with 14" reflectors visible for nine miles.

Tragedy struck in 1854 when the structure was destroyed by a massive hurricane. The tower was quickly rebuilt and enlarged on the same foundation the next year following Norris’ original plan.
At the start of the American Civil War, the light was temporarily extinguished, yet the small tower would soon become a silent witness to one of the war’s fiercest battles.

On April 10, 1862, Union forces in eleven batteries stretching along the beach at Tybee Island, began a long range bombardment of Fort Pulaski. Thirty-six guns participated in a thirty-hour siege of the fort with the Cockspur Lighthouse in direct line of fire.

Somehow, despite caught in the crossfire of the 5,200 shots fired back and forth across the river, the small tower survived. Following the surrender of Fort Pulaski on April 11, 1862, the little beacon miraculously had only suffered minor damage.

Theories abound as to why the tower escaped destruction. One theory suggests that to effectively hit Fort Pulaski’s walls, Union artillerists had to fire shots at a higher angle, thus passing over the tower. This strategy, coupled with the short duration of battle could explain why the tower was spared.
Following the Battle of Fort Pulaski, the tower remained dark for the nearly four years, until April 25, 1866, when the tower was relit and painted white for use as a daymark.

Despite surviving war, nature continued to take its toll on the Cockspur Lighthouse. On August 27, 1881, a massive storm struck Cockspur Island causing water to rise 23' above sea level. The storm surge filled the lighthouse interior and destroyed the Keeper's residence.

Jeremiah Keane (pronounced Keen), the Assistant Keeper, and two Fort Pulaski caretakers took refuge inside the Northwest stair tower of the old brick fort when the great Sea Islands hurricane of 1893 struck. Afterwards, a two story house was built atop Fort Pulaski for the light keeper and his family.

George Washington Martus, who took care of the lighthouse beginning in 1881, lived on Cockspur with his sister Florence for several years. Florence Martus enjoyed watching the passing ships and later began waving a white cloth at each passing ship. For more than 44 years she never missed a ship, and each ship, as it passed, returned her salute with three blasts of the whistle. Many stories were told of this small girl, who finally grew to be a white-haired old lady. Her efforts lived on in the stories and legends of the Waving Girl of Savannah.

In the end, man, not nature, extinguished forever the little light. To accommodate larger freighters, the increasingly busy Savannah port routed vessels to the deep, more navigable North Channel in 1909. No longer would this lighthouse guide vessels up the shallow South Channel of the Savannah River. The tower light went dark.

As the threat to the beacon by salvage crews and other private interests grew, the National Park Service looked into the acquisition of the lighthouse. On August 14, 1958, by presidential proclamation, the Cockspur Lighthouse was transferred from the United States Coast Guard to the National Park Service as part of Fort Pulaski National Monument.

Today, the National Park Service is dedicated to the preservation of this historic structure. Currently, the lighthouse faces continued threats from Mother Nature. After years of battling crashing waves and strong winds, the fragile wooden foundation is exposed, leading to shipworm infestation. The National Park Service continues to stabilize and maintain the foundation, while also raising awareness of this important piece of Georgia history. 
Sample script for auditions:

Clinging to the tip of Cockspur Island, the Cockspur Lighthouse has withstood crashing waves, the roar of cannons, and the wrath of time. For more than 150 years it has defiantly stood guard over the mouth of the Savannah River.

Tragedy struck in 1854 when the structure was destroyed by a massive hurricane. The tower was quickly rebuilt and enlarged on the same foundation the next year following Norris’ original plan.
At the start of the American Civil War, the light was temporarily extinguished, yet the small tower would soon become a silent witness to one of the war’s fiercest battles.

Somehow, despite caught in the crossfire of the 5,200 shots fired back and forth across the river, the small tower survived. Following the surrender of Fort Pulaski on April 11, 1862, the little beacon miraculously had only suffered minor damage.

Theories abound as to why the tower escaped destruction. One theory suggests that to effectively hit Fort Pulaski’s walls, Union artillerists had to fire shots at a higher angle, thus passing over the tower. This strategy, coupled with the short duration of battle could explain why the tower was spared.
Following the Battle of Fort Pulaski, the tower remained dark for the nearly four years, until April 25, 1866, when the tower was relit and painted white for use as a daymark.

In the end, man, not nature, extinguished forever the little light. To accommodate larger freighters, the increasingly busy Savannah port routed vessels to the deep, more navigable North Channel in 1909. No longer would this lighthouse guide vessels up the shallow South Channel of the Savannah River. The tower light went dark.

As the threat to the beacon by salvage crews and other private interests grew, the National Park Service looked into the acquisition of the lighthouse. On August 14, 1958, by presidential proclamation, the Cockspur Lighthouse was transferred from the United States Coast Guard to the National Park Service as part of Fort Pulaski National Monument.

Today, the National Park Service is dedicated to the preservation of this historic structure. Currently, the lighthouse faces continued threats from Mother Nature. After years of battling crashing waves and strong winds, the fragile wooden foundation is exposed, leading to shipworm infestation. The National Park Service continues to stabilize and maintain the foundation, while also raising awareness of this important piece of Georgia history. 
Please note that you should only use the script or your recording of it for auditioning purposes. The script is property, unless otherwise specified, of the voice seeker and it is protected by international copyright laws.

Voice-Seeker Details

47924
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2008-07-27
3

17


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