Civil War Mini Documentary

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Project Main Details

Civil War Mini Documentary 
ZDLTK15206472155X
Creating a mini-documentary on a group of Civil War prisoners held at Fort Pulaski. An important yet somber subject, includes two quotes by actual prisoners. Will be overlayed with images and music so it could be broken up in intervals.
 
2008-07-27 11:52:30 GMT
2008-07-29 23:13:03 (GMT -05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada) 
Yes (click here to learn more about Voice123's SmartCast)
Closed - Note: This project was manually closed by the voice seeker before it reached its original deadline.
16
16
2 direct invitation(s) have been sent by the voice seeker resulting in 1 audition(s) and/or proposal(s) so far.
Voice123 SmartCast is seeking 20 auditions and/or proposals for this project (approx.) Invitations sent by SmartCast have resulted in 15 audition(s) and/or proposal(s) so far.

Project Parameters

The Voice Actor should be located in:
Student or Non-for-profit student project - USD 250
Podcasts
No
12 minutes
English - USA and Canada
Civil War southern accent for quotes
Middle Age Male OR Senior Male
• Audio files must be delivered via email
There are no special pre-, post-, or production requirements for this project.
Not defined
The voice seeker is willing to hire either union or non-union talents for this project

Script Details

Yes
Script provided by the voice seeker:

In October 1864, Union troops at Fort Pulaski accepted transfer of imprisoned Confederate officers who would later be known as “The Immortal Six Hundred.”

The officers' plight started in Charleston when Edwin M. Stanton, Federal Secretary of War, ordered that 600 prisoners of war be positioned on Morris Island in the harbor within direct line of fire from Confederate guns at Fort Sumter. Stanton's order followed word that 600 Union officers imprisoned in the city of Charleston were exposed to direct line of fire from federal artillery.

The standoff continued until a yellow fever epidemic forced Confederate Major General S. Jones to remove the prisoners from the city limits. The federal command then transferred the surviving Confederate officers from Morris Island to Fort Pulaski.

On October 23, 1864, 550 tired, ill-clothed, men arrived at Cockspur Island. At first, the emaciated troops received extra rations, and were promised wool blankets and clothing. However, despite the best intentions of the garrison command, the prisoners never received sufficient food, blankets or clothes. Scurvy and dysentery began to take its toll.

"Two days ago, Lt. George B. Fitzgerald was taken to the hospital, and this morning announcement was made that "Fitz is dead...He has had no blanket, no socks, hardly clothes to cover him; none of us could supply him, and he slept alone, covering himself with an old piece of tent fly... " Capt. Henry Dickinson; 2nd VA. Cav.

On December 15, Col. Phillip P. Brown, Jr. of the 157th New York Volunteers, was ordered to impose a starvation ration of one-quarter pound bread, 10 ounces cornmeal, and one-half pint of pickles daily. For 43 days in the coldest months, the prisoners survived on this cornmeal and pickle diet. Cats and dogs that wandered into the prison were immediately cooked and eaten.

"After picking out the lumps, bugs, and worms in this rotten corn meal there was not more than seven ounces of meal left fit for use. “Capt. J. Ogden Murray; VA. 7th Cav. Staff

Savannah surrendered on December 25, 1864. Soon after, prisoners were put back on full rations, yet conditions remained forlorn. On March 5, 1865, the long ordeal finally came to an end.
465 survivors were sent to Fort Delaware where conditions were somewhat better than at Fort Pulaski.

During the Immortal Six Hundred's incarceration at Fort Pulaski, thirteen prisoners died. The dead were buried on site at Cockspur Island, Georgia. 
Sample for auditions:

In October 1864, Union troops at Fort Pulaski accepted transfer of imprisoned Confederate officers who would later be known as “The Immortal Six Hundred.”

The officers' plight started in Charleston when Edwin M. Stanton, Federal Secretary of War, ordered that 600 prisoners of war be positioned on Morris Island in the harbor within direct line of fire from Confederate guns at Fort Sumter. Stanton's order followed word that 600 Union officers imprisoned in the city of Charleston were exposed to direct line of fire from federal artillery.

The standoff continued until a yellow fever epidemic forced Confederate Major General S. Jones to remove the prisoners from the city limits. The federal command then transferred the surviving Confederate officers from Morris Island to Fort Pulaski.

 
Please note that you should only use the script or your recording of it for auditioning purposes. The script is property, unless otherwise specified, of the voice seeker and it is protected by international copyright laws.

Voice-Seeker Details

47924
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2008-07-27
3

17


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